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Freedom Equality Solidarity - Thoughts on Europe's Future - from Germany France and Poland - cover

Freedom Equality Solidarity - Thoughts on Europe's Future - from Germany France and Poland

Bertelsmann Stiftung

Publisher: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung

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Summary

Although the principles of democracy are in abstract stable concepts, every generation must consider anew how best to apply them in society. What do the principles of freedom, equality and solidarity mean to today's Germans, French and Poles?
Twelve authors and interview partners from Germany, France and Poland, including Marianne Birthler, André Glucksmann and Adam Krzemiński, provide moving responses to important questions about a common European future.

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