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A World in Transition - cover

A World in Transition

Bertelsmann Stiftung

Publisher: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung

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Summary

What reforms must governments initiate in order to ensure the sustainability of their societies? What examples of success can we identify by systematically comparing countries around the world? And who will shape the political and economic future in the 21st century?

This E-Book Reader is a supplement to the upcoming edition (June 2014) of our Germanlanguage quarterly change, which takes as its focus "A World in Transition." Addressing sustainability in governance, strategic steering capacity in policymaking, and the most important global and regional developments of the past three years, the contributions featured here are excerpts from publications published by the Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung.

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