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Maaate! Bribe-Proofing the Public Purse Against Good Blokes - cover

Maaate! Bribe-Proofing the Public Purse Against Good Blokes

Bernie Dowling

Publisher: Bent Banana Books

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Summary

IN 2017 a man named Paul Pisasale is facing criminal charges including corruption in public office, extortion, assault, and attempting to pervert justice. In 2016 Mr. Pisasale was re-elected Mayor of the Queensland City of Ipswich with 83.45 per cent of the popular vote. 
Something is broken at councils in south-east Queensland. By 2017, it could not be ignored. The Crime and Corruption Commission, CCC, called an inquiry into the 2016 elections for councils of Moreton Bay Region, Ipswich, Logan City and the Gold Coast. 
Journalist Bernie Dowling unpicks the evidence at the inquiry and presents insider yarns from his 17 years as a reporter in Moreton Bay Region. 
An award winner for humor Dowling presents a funny and thoughtful analysis of what happens when you buy your democracy off the back of a truck.

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