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Eating for Health and Strength - cover

Eating for Health and Strength

Bernarr Macfadden

Publisher: E-BOOKARAMA

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Summary

Published in 1923, "Eating for Health and Strength" by Bernarr Macfadden explains how and what to eat and drink to develop the highest degree of health and strength. The beauty and glory of superb physical health are within the reach of all who are willing to strive for such glorious rewards.
Some "Eat to live"; others "Live to eat," but if you so live that the highest and most intense enjoyment can be secured from eating that superb health which at times thrills every nerve with surplus power will be your ever-present possession.

Bernarr Macfadden was an American proponent of physical culture, a combination of bodybuilding with nutritional and health theories. He founded the long-running magazine publishing company Macfadden Publications. He was the predecessor of Charles Atlas and Jack LaLanne, and has been credited with beginning the culture of health and fitness in the United States.

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