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This Time - Australia's Republican Past and Future - cover

This Time - Australia's Republican Past and Future

Benjamin T. Jones

Publisher: Black Inc. Redback

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Summary

To propose an Australian should be our head of state doesn’t seem revolutionary. ‘Isn’t that already the case?” some may even ask. Flip a coin and you’ll have your answer.

In This Time, Benjamin T. Jones charts a path to an independent future. He reveals the fascinating early history of the Australian republican movement of the 1850s and its larger-than-life characters. He shows why we need a new model for a transformed, multicultural nation, and discusses the best way to choose an Australian head of state. With republicans leading every government around the nation, the time is ripe for change.

‘Powerful and compelling. This is the book we’ve been waiting for. Jones has written the most passionate and coherent argument for an Australian republic in decades.’ —Mark McKenna, author of An Eye for Eternity: The Life of Manning Clark

‘This is an important Australian book about an important Australian campaign. Benjamin T. Jones tells the republican story as it should be told - as the story of Australia’s long journey towards its own best self.’ —Michael Cooney, national director of the Australian Republic Movement

‘This Time takes us to the high ground of political argument. His republic is one that institutionalises and promotes the values of democracy, meritocracy and community not just in our constitution but also in the many symbols we need to unite and inspire our citizens, including our flag, our coins and our national anthem.’ —Geoff Gallop, former premier of Western Australia

‘If you want to think, for the very first time, about why Australia needs an Australian Head of State, this is the book for you. Passionate, provocative and patriotic, this is the book we all need for the Republic we have to have.’ –Clare Wright, historian

‘Thought it would be good. Didn’t think it would be one of the best and most fascinating books I have read for years. Benjamin T. Jones for PM! Stuff that – Benjamin T. Jones FOR PRESIDENT!’ —Catherine Deveny

Benjamin T. Jones is a research fellow in the School of History, ANU. He is co-editor of Project Republic, appears regularly on ABC Radio National and writes for The Conversation.

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