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The Fundamentals of Drawing Landscapes - cover

The Fundamentals of Drawing Landscapes

Barrington Barber

Publisher: Arcturus Publishing

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Summary

For centuries landscapes have captivated the imaginations of artists- Barrington Barber follows the pattern established in his highly successful companion volume on drawing portraits, and shows the reader that it is easier than it looks.

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