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eso-exoteria allegorical writings and drawings - cover

eso-exoteria allegorical writings and drawings

Baltasar

Publisher: Baltasar

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Summary

…what I am about to dance, is a roundabout dance, around myself.
A dervish-like dance, a circular dance, a silent dance ... that disorients me, unbalances me, and sets before me, while I continue to see an image of myself, the truth on my inability to know the Truth. My knowledge blurred by ignorance, by prejudice, and by lies…
…a wonderful condition that is difficult to grasp if you insist on seeing, and experiencing, the human condition only within the mono-dimensional space of the immanent. A unique condition is that of man, since he is gifted with Reason and Sentiment, simultaneously. Two different forces that, if combined, indicate a direction towards which man was not looking. A direction that, perhaps, leads to other cognizable conditions of a superior order…
 

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