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There Are Crimes and Crimes - cover

There Are Crimes and Crimes

August Strindberg

Translator Edwin Björkman

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

"There Are Crimes and Crimes" by August Strindberg (translated by Edwin Björkman). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.
Available since: 12/02/2019.
Print length: 55 pages.

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