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Walking Between Worlds - A Spiritual Odyssey - cover

Walking Between Worlds - A Spiritual Odyssey

Athena Demetrios

Publisher: She Writes Press

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Summary

•	One in five women and one in seventy-one men will be raped at some point in their lives. 
•	One in three girls and one in seven boys are sexually abused by age eighteen. Over 90% of these sexually abused children were abused by someone they knew. 
•	Only one in ten children who are sexually abused will ever tell anyone. 
•	In the U.S., one in three women and one in six men have experienced some form of contact sexual violence in their lifetime .
•	PTSD affects 7.7 million adults, or 3.5% of the U.S. population. Women are more likely to be affected than men. Rape is the most likely trigger of PTSD: 65% of men and 45.9% of women who are raped will develop the disorder. Childhood sexual abuse is a strong predictor of lifetime likelihood for developing PTSD. (Anxiety and Depression Association of America)
•	Some 6.6 million children live in a home with at least one alcoholic parent. It’s estimated that one in four children in the U.S. is exposed to alcohol abuse in the home. Researchers have said that alcoholism is typically accompanied by other problems related to their addiction, including a lack of effective communication, nonexistent parenting skills, homes with no set schedules, structure or discipline, escalated conflict in the home including fighting and arguing, family isolation in the community because of the abuse of alcohol, and financial issues. Children of alcoholics are more likely to suffer from mood disorders such as anxiety and clinical depression. (HealthResearchFunding.org)
•	 About one-third of Americans believe that ghosts exist and can interact with humans; around two-thirds hold supernatural or paranormal beliefs of some kind, including beliefs in reincarnation, spiritual energy and psychic powers. (The New York Times)
•	Past life regression is being practiced as a medical treatment by an increasing number of professional psychiatrists. Dr. Brian Weiss, MD, is a pioneer in the use of regression therapy for psychological and physical healing; he has written several bestselling books on regression to past lifetimes as a means to heal the mind, body, and soul.

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