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Philippines: Energy Sector Assessment Strategy and Road Map - cover

Philippines: Energy Sector Assessment Strategy and Road Map

Asian Development Bank

Publisher: Asian Development Bank

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Summary

This energy sector assessment, strategy, and road map documents the status and strategic priorities of the Government of the Philippines in the energy sector. It highlights sector performance, development constraints, government plans and strategies, past support of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and other development partners, and the strategy for future ADB support in the energy sector. It also provides sector background information for investment and technical assistance operations. The assessment is based on a systematic review of the Philippines' energy sector and consultations with the government and other development partners.

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