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The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes - cover

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

Arthur Conan Doyle

Publisher: Adelphi Press

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Summary

Doyle had decided that these Sherlock Holmes stories would be the last collection, and intended to kill him off in 'The Final Problem'. Reader demand stimulated him to write another Holmes adventure, 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'. In 'The Return of Sherlock Holmes', Holmes relates the aftermath of 'The Final Problem', and how he survived.

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