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Hound of Baskerville - cover

Hound of Baskerville

Arthur Conan Doyle

Publisher: Nórdica Libros

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Summary

The Hound of the Baskervilles is the third novel by Arthur Conan Doyle whose main character Sherlock Holmes. It was serialized in The Strand Magazine between 1901 and 1902. 
The book is about the tension between the otherworldly and the real, between superstition and science. 
Holmes will seek logical explanation, which will eventually be imposed, within the canons of detective fiction, the events that occur in the wilderness west of England.

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