Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Politics - cover

Politics

Aristotle Aristotle

Publisher: FV Éditions

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. The title of the Politics literally means "the things concerning the polis". Aristotle's Politics is divided into eight books which are each further divided into chapters.

Other books that might interest you

  • Blind Colossus - cover

    Blind Colossus

    Antonia Hildebrand

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Antonia Hildebrand, author of The Nine Eleven Handbook, explores how the neo-liberal worldview was created and for what social, political and economic purposes it came into being. Going back to the Great Depression of the thirties, Hildebrand describes an agenda devoted to the creation of an elite which is now so insulated by its power that it is largely unaccountable and owns a large slab of the world's wealth. In the United States at least, it controls the law, the military, the media and the banking system, leading to widespread injustice, social instability and financial collapses that are all the more threatening because they are now global. This elite now wants to rule the world and is attempting to give its tyranny the appearance of legality by creating 'free trade agreements' which render national governments impotent and the outcomes of elections null and void. Drawing on historical fact, Hildebrand lays bare the desire for untrammelled power that lies behind such catch cries as 'the level playing field', 'workplace flexibility' and 'deregulation' while exploring the ubiquitous intrusion of free market economics into every area of 21st century life. To many people the unravelling of democracy and national sovereignty may seem random, even inevitable, but in The Blind Colossus, the methodical plan to re-create a feudal system and turn the entire world into a vast labour hire firm is clarified and dissected, revealing that none of it is random. It is, rather, a carefully constructed plan to render democracy and even the rule of law irrelevant and archaic. For this elite, anything that doesn't increase its wealth and power is to be swept into the dustbin of history.
    Show book
  • Future Tense - The Lessons of Culture in an Age of Upheaval - cover

    Future Tense - The Lessons of...

    Roger Kimball

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    We are living in an age of unprecedented upheaval.  The future of Western culture is uncertain.  America’s economic and political vitality are more fragile than ever.  The preservation of tradition is far from guaranteed.Many have observed that we are living through a world historical moment of which Hegel spoke: a time when many of the traditional assumptions about the shape and future of culture are suddenly in play.  As The New Criterion embarks on its fourth decade of publication, the magazine commemorates its commitment to the civilizing values of informed criticism with the publication of Future Tense: The Lessons of Culture in an Age of Upheaval.Compiling the writings of some of the greatest essayists of our time, Future Tense examines this pivotal period through a variety of lenses.  Beginning with a meditation on memorials after the 9/11 attacks (Michael J. Lewis), the essays address patriotism in relation to Pericles (Victor Davis Hanson), twenty-first century American pride and leadership (Andrew Roberts), the future of religion in America (David Bentley Hart), and the unwinding of the welfare state (Kevin D. Williamson).  Continuing this arc, pieces examine self-knowledge and modern technology (Anthony Daniels), the cultural capital of museums (James Panero), and the difficulties of making law in the modern world (Andrew C. McCarthy).  In its penultimate essay, the book explores the possibility of a forthcoming political revolution (James Piereson), then closes with a reflection of culture’s role in the economy of life and the fragility of civilization (Roger Kimball).Taken together, these prominent writers demonstrate an acute understanding of the value of Western thought as well as the challenges it faces.  Future Tense is an engaging discourse on the prospects of society and an important collection for anyone concerned with the longevity of traditional culture.
    Show book
  • The Democrats - A Critical History - cover

    The Democrats - A Critical History

    Lance Selfa

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "The Democrats: A Critical History is worthy reading for anyone who is interested in social change."--MediaMouse.org 
    The 2006 elections put the Democrats in the majority in both houses of Congress, yet those hoping for change have been deeply disappointed. Lance Selfa looks at the Democrats in a broad historical perspective, showing that today’s betrayals stem from the Democratic Party’s role as one of the two parties serving the interests of the US establishment, not of the broader public or its “base” of women, African Americans, trade union members, and working and poor people. 
    Many other books on the Democrats have seen the party’s recent history as a departure from its storied past as the “party of the people.” Selfa’s book is one of the few written for a popular audience to challenge this myth and to put today’s crisis of the Democratic Party’s legitimacy in a historical perspective. 
    As the 2008 presidential season heats up, there will be many books about individual candidates and their personalities. This book is for people who want to go beyond campaign puffery to look at the serious topics and questions at stake, with a vision that isn’t limited to the next election cycle. 
    Lance Selfa is a researcher and author. An editor and contributor to International Socialist Review, he edited The Struggle for Palestine (Haymarket Books, 2002). He lives in Chicago.
    Show book
  • Trading Barriers - Immigration and the Remaking of Globalization - cover

    Trading Barriers - Immigration...

    Margaret Peters

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Why have countries increasingly restricted immigration even when they have opened their markets to foreign competition through trade or allowed their firms to move jobs overseas? In Trading Barriers, Margaret Peters argues that the increased ability of firms to produce anywhere in the world combined with growing international competition due to lowered trade barriers has led to greater limits on immigration.Peters explains that businesses relying on low-skill labor have been the major proponents of greater openness to immigrants. Immigration helps lower costs, making these businesses more competitive at home and abroad. However, increased international competition, due to lower trade barriers and greater economic development in the developing world, has led many businesses in wealthy countries to close or move overseas. Productivity increases have allowed those firms that have chosen to remain behind to do more with fewer workers. Together, these changes in the international economy have sapped the crucial business support necessary for more open immigration policies at home, empowered anti-immigrant groups, and spurred greater controls on migration.Debunking the commonly held belief that domestic social concerns are the deciding factor in determining immigration policy, Trading Barriers demonstrates the important and influential role played by international trade and capital movements.
    Show book
  • Suburban Warriors - The Origins of the New American Right - Updated Edition - cover

    Suburban Warriors - The Origins...

    Lisa McGirr

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In the early 1960s, American conservatives seemed to have fallen on hard times. McCarthyism was on the run, and movements on the political left were grabbing headlines. The media lampooned John Birchers's accusations that Dwight Eisenhower was a communist puppet. Mainstream America snickered at warnings by California Congressman James B. Utt that "barefooted Africans" were training in Georgia to help the United Nations take over the country. Yet, in Utt's home district of Orange County, thousands of middle-class suburbanites proceeded to organize a powerful conservative movement that would land Ronald Reagan in the White House and redefine the spectrum of acceptable politics into the next century. Suburban Warriors introduces us to these people: women hosting coffee klatches for Barry Goldwater in their tract houses; members of anticommunist reading groups organizing against sex education; pro-life Democrats gradually drawn into conservative circles; and new arrivals finding work in defense companies and a sense of community in Orange County's mushrooming evangelical churches. We learn what motivated them and how they interpreted their political activity. Lisa McGirr shows that their movement was not one of marginal people suffering from status anxiety, but rather one formed by successful entrepreneurial types with modern lifestyles and bright futures. She describes how these suburban pioneers created new political and social philosophies anchored in a fusion of Christian fundamentalism, xenophobic nationalism, and western libertarianism.  While introducing these rank-and-file activists, McGirr chronicles Orange County's rise from "nut country" to political vanguard. Through this history, she traces the evolution of the New Right from a virulent anticommunist, anti-establishment fringe to a broad national movement nourished by evangelical Protestantism. Her original contribution to the social history of politics broadens—and often upsets—our understanding of the deep and tenacious roots of popular conservatism in America.
    Show book
  • Who's Counting? - How Fraudsters and Bureaucrats Put Your Vote at Risk - cover

    Who's Counting? - How Fraudsters...

    John Fund, Hans von Spakovsky

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The 2012 election will be one of the hardest-fought in U.S. history. It is also likely to be one of the closest, a fact that brings concerns about voter fraud and bureaucratic incompetence in the conduct of elections front and center. If we don't take notice, we could see another debacle like the Bush-Gore Florida recount of 2000 in which courts and lawyers intervened in what should have involved only voters.Who's Counting? will focus attention on many problems of our election system, ranging from voter fraud to a slipshod system of vote counting that noted political scientist Walter Dean Burnham calls “the most careless of the developed world.” In an effort to clean up our election laws, reduce fraud and increase public confidence in the integrity of the voting system, many states ranging from Georgia to Wisconsin have passed laws requiring a photo ID be shown at the polls and curbing the rampant use of absentee ballots, a tool of choice by fraudsters. The response from Obama allies has been to belittle the need for such laws and attack them as akin to the second coming of a racist tide in American life. In the summer of 2011, both Bill Clinton and DNC chairman Debbie Wasserman Schultz preposterously claimed that such laws suppressed minority voters and represented a return to the era of Jim Crow.But voter fraud is a well-documented reality in American elections. Just this year, a sheriff and county clerk in West Virginia pleaded guilty to stuffing ballot boxes with fraudulent absentee ballots that changed the outcome of an election. In 2005, a state senate election in Tennessee was overturned because of voter fraud. The margin of victory? 13 votes. In 2008, the Minnesota senate race that provided the 60th vote needed to pass Obamacare was decided by a little over 300 votes. Almost 200 felons have already been convicted of voting illegally in that election and dozens of other prosecutions are still pending. Public confidence in the integrity of elections is at an all-time low. In the Cooperative Congressional Election Study of 2008, 62% of American voters thought that voter fraud was very common or somewhat common. Fear that elections are being stolen erodes the legitimacy of our government. That's why the vast majority of Americans support laws like Kansas's Secure and Fair Elections Act. A 2010 Rasmussen poll showed that 82% of Americans support photo ID laws.While Americans frequently demand observers and best practices in the elections of other countries, we are often blind to the need to scrutinize our own elections. We may pay the consequences in 2012 if a close election leads us into pitched partisan battles and court fights that will dwarf the Bush-Gore recount wars.
    Show book