What's better than reading? Reading withour limits :D
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
On Sophistical Refutations - cover

On Sophistical Refutations

Aristotle Aristotle

Publisher: Charles River Editors

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Aristotle was an ancient Greek philosopher who was largely responsible for shaping Western philosophy as it is known today.  Aristotle, who was one of Plato’s students and would later tutor Alexander the Great, was also regarded as the world’s first scientist and his many writings are still revered today.  This edition of On Sophistical Refutations includes a table of contents. 

Other books that might interest you

  • In Their Own Words 2 - More letters from history - cover

    In Their Own Words 2 - More...

    Archives The National

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    Letters, postcards, notes and telegraphs from the great and the good, the notorious and the downright wicked, shine a spotlight on a range of historical events and movements providing an immediate link to the immediate and much more distant past. 
      
    The book includes letters from: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Mikhail Gorbachev, Lucien Freud, Barbara Hepworth, Nelson Mandela, Caitlin Thomas, Mary Whitehouse, Gandhi, George Washington among many others. Subjects covered include suffragette disturbances, obscene publications, relations between international leaders, child emigration including the Kindertransport. 
      
    The book features 55 letters, each with a 600-word essay, and a 3000 word introduction. There are 150 images in the book: 55 of the letters themselves, and a further 95 supplementary images.
    Show book
  • Sapiens - A Brief History of Humankind - cover

    Sapiens - A Brief History of...

    Yuval Noah Harari

    • 23
    • 645
    • 0
    New York Times Bestseller 
    A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg  
    From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” 
    One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? 
    Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. 
    Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? 
    Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.
    Show book
  • Old Florence and Modern Tuscany - cover

    Old Florence and Modern Tuscany

    Janet Rossi

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Old Florence and Modern Tuscany is an overview of the area by Janet Ross, a British expatriate.
    Show book
  • The Search for the Green River Killer - The True Story of America's Most Prolific Serial Killer - cover

    The Search for the Green River...

    Carlton Smith, Tomas Guillen

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    New York Times Bestseller: From the journalists who covered the story, the shocking crimes of Gary Ridgway, America’s most prolific serial murderer.  In the 1980s and 1990s, forty-nine women in the Seattle area were brutally murdered, their bodies dumped along the Green River and Pacific Highway South in Washington State. Despite an exhaustive investigation—even serial killer Ted Bundy was consulted to assist with psychological profiling—the sadistic killer continued to elude authorities for nearly twenty years. Then, in 2001, after mounting suspicion and with DNA evidence finally in hand, King County police charged a fifty-two-year-old truck painter, Gary Ridgway, with the murders. His confession and the horrific details of his crimes only added fuel to the notoriety of the Green River Killer.   Journalists Carlton Smith and Tomas Guillen covered the murders for the Seattle Times from day one, receiving a Pulitzer Prize nomination for their work. They wrote the first edition of this book before the police had their man. Revised after Ridgway’s conviction and featuring chilling photographs from the case, The Search for the Green River Killer is the ultimate authoritative account of the Pacific Northwest killing spree that held a nation spellbound—and continues to horrify and fascinate, spawning dramatizations and documentaries of a demented killer who seemed unstoppable for decades.  
    Show book
  • Closing Time - The True Story of the "Looking for Mr Goodbar" Murder - cover

    Closing Time - The True Story of...

    Lacey Fosburgh

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    The real story behind the murder of a Manhattan schoolteacher that became a symbol of the dangers of casual sex: “A first-rate achievement” (Truman Capote). In 1973, Roseann Quinn, an Irish-Catholic teacher at a school for deaf children, was killed in New York City after bringing a man home to her apartment from an Upper West Side pub. The crime would not only make headlines, but would soon be fictionalized in the #1 New York Times–bestselling novel Looking for Mr. Goodbar and adapted into a film of the same name, starring Diane Keaton and Richard Gere. The case evolved a cultural phenomenon, sparking debates about the sexual revolution and the perils of the “pickup scene” at what were popularly known as singles bars.   In this groundbreaking, inventive true crime tale, the New York Times reporter first assigned to the story offers “a meticulous, investigative account of the so-called Goodbar killing” (Los Angeles Times). Using a dramatization technique in which she gives the victim a different name, Lacey Fosburgh veers between the chilling, suspenseful personal interactions leading up to the brutal stabbing and the gritty facts of the aftermath, including the NYPD investigation and the arrest of John Wayne Wilson.   The result is a must-read that earned an Edgar Award nomination for Best Fact Crime, and a classic of the genre that Men’s Journal described as “more riveting, and more tragic, than the Judith Rossner novel—and the 1977 movie Looking for Mr. Goodbar.” In the words of the New York Times, “Fosburgh writes with compassion of these sick and shattered lives.”  
    Show book
  • Life Less Lonely A: What We Can All Do to Lead More Connected Kinder Lives - cover

    Life Less Lonely A: What We Can...

    Nick Duerden

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Loneliness has reached the levels of an epidemic. From the bullied child to the new parent, from the pensioner who has outlived friends and family members to teenagers who manage their social lives through the glow of a mobile phone, it can - and does - affect anyone and everyone, irrespective of age, race or class. Many suffer in silence, convinced it's a confession too far, a sign of too much vulnerability, a shameful failing. But the human condition is not a failing. 
     
    What's it like when loneliness descends? How does it announce itself, and how do you recognise it? Do you discuss it, or conceal it? From where can you seek help? 
     
    A Life Less Lonely shares stories of loneliness and social isolation, and looks for ways in which we can help one another to future-proof ourselves against this most insidious affliction. By talking to those who suffer from it, and by highlighting the work of those who fight to combat it, the book offers guidance on how to spot the symptoms in yourself and in others, how to connect with those around you, and how, by understanding it all better, we might just set ourselves free from it. 
     
    In this way, what is an epidemic today might not be one tomorrow.
    Show book