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The Seagull - cover

The Seagull

Anton Chekhov

Translator Constance Garnett

Publisher: Adelphi Press

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Summary

The Seagull is one of the best ever dramas about the theatre, yet on the very first opening night it was a famous failure. The play triumphed later in Stanislavski's production and became one of the greatest events in the history of Russian theatre and one of the greatest new developments in the history of world drama.

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