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The Greatest Novellas & Short Stories of Anton Chekhov - Living Chattel Bliss At The Barber's Enigmatic Nature Classical Student Matter of Classics - cover

The Greatest Novellas & Short Stories of Anton Chekhov - Living Chattel Bliss At The Barber's Enigmatic Nature Classical Student Matter of Classics

Anton Chekhov

Translator Julian Hawthorne, Constance Garnett, Thomas Seltzer, Marian Fell, Herman Bernstein, Robert Edward Crozier Long, C.E. Bechhofer Roberts, S. S. Koteliansky, Gilbert Cannan, J. M. Murry, B. Roland Lewis, Julius West

Publisher: Musaicum Books

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Summary

Anton Chekhov's collection of novellas and short stories encapsulates the essence of 19th-century Russian literature with its depth of psychological insight and nuanced characterizations. The diverse literary style of Chekhov is reflected in his ability to blend realism with elements of symbolism and irony, making each story a thought-provoking journey into the human experience. This anthology includes timeless classics such as 'The Lady with the Dog,' 'The Cherry Orchard,' and 'The Seagull.' Chekhov's observations of everyday life and human relationships shine through in his masterful storytelling, captivating readers with his keen observations and subtle humor. The themes of love, loss, and the passage of time are universal and resonate with readers of all backgrounds and cultures. Chekhov's works continue to be studied and admired for their enduring relevance and profound insights into the human condition.
Available since: 08/07/2017.
Print length: 2500 pages.

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