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The Best Russian Plays and Short Stories by Dostoevsky Tolstoy Chekhov Gorky Gogol and many more (Unabridged): An All Time Favorite Collection from the Renowned Russian dramatists and Writers (Including Essays and Lectures on Russian Novelists) - cover

The Best Russian Plays and Short Stories by Dostoevsky Tolstoy Chekhov Gorky Gogol and many more (Unabridged): An All Time Favorite Collection from the Renowned Russian dramatists and Writers (Including Essays and Lectures on Russian Novelists)

Anton Chekhov, A.S. Pushkin, N.V. Gogol, I.S. Turgenev, F.M. Dostoyevsky, L.N. Tolstoy, M.Y. Saltykov, V.G. Korolenko, V.N. Garshin, F.K. Sologub, I. N. Potapenko, S.T. Semyonov, Maxim Gorky, L.N. Andreyev, M.P. Artzybashev, A. I. Kuprin, William Lyon Phelps

Translator Thomas Seltzer

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

This carefully crafted ebook: "The Best Russian Plays and Short Stories by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gorky, Gogol and many more (Unabridged)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. It is said that if you haven't read the great Russian playwrights and authors then you haven't read anything at all. This edition represents a collection of some of the greatest Russian plays and short stories: Plays The Inspector General Savva The Life of Man Short Stories The Queen of Spades The Cloak The District Doctor The Christmas Tree And The Wedding God Sees The Truth, But Waits How A Muzhik Fed Two Officials The Shades, A Phantasy The Signal The Darling The Bet Vanka Hide And Seek Dethroned The Servant One Autumn Night Her Lover Lazarus The Revolutionist The Outrage An Honest Thief A Novel in Nine Letters An Unpleasant Predicament Another Man's Wife The Heavenly Christmas Tree The Peasant Marey The Crocodile Bobok The Dream of a Ridiculous Man Mumu The Shot St. John'S Eve An Old Acquaintance The Mantle The Nose Memoirs Of A Madman A May Night The Viy Knock, Knock, Knock The Inn Lieutenant Yergunov's Story The Dog The Watch Essays On Russian Novelists Lectures On Russian Novelists

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