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Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War (Illustrated Edition) - Civil War Memories Series - cover

Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War (Illustrated Edition) - Civil War Memories Series

Anonymous

Publisher: Madison & Adams Press

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Summary

Madison & Adams Press presents the Civil War Memories Series. This meticulous selection of the firsthand accounts, memoirs and diaries is specially comprised for Civil War enthusiasts and all people curious about the personal accounts and true life stories of the unknown soldiers, the well known commanders, politicians, nurses and civilians amidst the war. 
"Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War" is a collection of seven narratives gathered and edited by the first modern southern writer, George Washington Cable. Mr. Cable put together the most interesting Civil War stories he had heard, which he shared with the readers and thusly saved them from oblivion. 
Contents:
War Diary of a Union Woman in the South
The Locomotive Chase in Georgia
Mosby's "Partizan Rangers"
A Romance of Morgan's Rough-riders
Colonel Rose's Tunnel at Libby Prison
A Hard Road to Travel out of Dixie
Escape of General Breckinridge

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