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I'll Have Some of Yours - What my mother taught me about cookies music the outside and her life inside a care home - cover

I'll Have Some of Yours - What my mother taught me about cookies music the outside and her life inside a care home

Annette Januzzi Wick

Publisher: Three Arch Press

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Summary

Annette Januzzi Wick longs to find the perfect care home for her proud, Italian mother, who is slipping further into dementia. In her memoir, Annette shares gripping truths about the mistakes she makes before ultimately finding a place where her mother develops a crush, heckles an Elvis impersonator, and magically bonds with her daughter through Frank Sinatra's songs. Whether she is breaking up a fight between her mother and the Easter Bunny, advocating for her mother to avoid a tracheotomy, or struggling to duplicate her mother's cookie recipes, Annette tries to balance the trials with the triumphs of being a daughter-and caregiver. But can she and her mother love without memory-or regret? I'll Have Some of Yours is for anyone who longs to move past being a caregiver to find a deeply human and humane connection with someone you love.

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