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Shared Gardens - cover

Shared Gardens

Anne Biggs

Publisher: Paradigm Hall Press

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Summary

Shared Gardens brings the Garden Trilogy full circle. Claire's journey in search of her birth-mother is chronicled in this intense fictionaliztion of the authors own story of abandonment and adoption. 
Alice's story of The Swan Garden and that of her daughters in Garden of Nails, are brought together from Finn's perspective, the child deprived of family by antiquated views of morality. 
It is heart-breaking. It is maddening. 

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