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A Life Full of Glitter - A Guide to Positive Thinking Self-Acceptance and Finding Your Sparkle in a (Sometimes) Negative World - cover

A Life Full of Glitter - A Guide to Positive Thinking Self-Acceptance and Finding Your Sparkle in a (Sometimes) Negative World

Anna O'Brien

Publisher: Mango

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Summary

#1 Amazon New Release! — A Modern Guide to Positive Thinking 
Learn the importance of expression: A Life Full of Glitter will show you how much creativity, physical activity and social interactions affect your day to day life. Learn how to maximize these expressive activities to release pent up emotions and frustration in order to have a fresh view of the world each and every day. 
Re-frame your thinking: Bullying, loss, regret and fear impact our lives in tough-to-deal-with ways. Learn how to confront these and other challenges like the world’s happiest people do—as opportunities. Armed with humor and a good attitude, author Anna O’Brien will teach you how to combat the negativity of life in this motivational self-help guide. 
Move on from unresolvable issues: It can be difficult to process and move on from unresolvable issues that are holding us back from our most positive lives. A Life Full of Glitter introduces the concept of “long-game” thinking, which will help you re-frame temporary setbacks and focus on long-term happiness. Discover easy-to-use tips and tricks to increase your positivity and personal growth. 
Improve your relationships, opportunities and overall well-being: Modern research shows that positivity improves almost every aspect of your life. A Life Full of Glitter will walk you through the findings of this research with real life examples and humorous teachable moments from author Anna O’Brien’s own life. Allow Anna’s book to help you increase your happiness and self-esteem. 
A Life Full of Glitter is a modern guide to positive thinking presented through relevant research, captivating storytelling, and plenty of humor. In reading this book, you will:Learn quick tips and tricks for shifting your mind to think positivelyBe introduced to new ways to address every day challengesMaster how to move on from feelings and experiences that are holding you back from happiness

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