Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Poor Had No Lawyers - Who Owns Scotland (and How They Got It) - cover

The Poor Had No Lawyers - Who Owns Scotland (and How They Got It)

Andy Wightman

Publisher: Birlinn

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

In this updated edition of his “utterly magnificent” social history, the Scottish parliamentarian examines the privatization of Scotland’s common land (Sunday Herald, UK). As an author, activist, and politician, Andy Wightman has made a career of fighting for Scottish land reform. In this provocative and influential book, Wightman offers a revealing analysis of how and why landowners got their hands on the millions of acres that were once held in common. He also tells the untold story of how the Scottish legal and political establishment appropriated land through legal fixes. Throughout, Wightman poses some provocative questions: Have attempts to redistribute power made any difference? What are the implications of the debt-fueled housing bubble, the Smith Commission, and the new Scottish Government's proposals on land reform? Can we get our common good land back? For all those with an interest in urban and rural land in Scotland, this edition of The Poor Had No Lawyers, updated with new statistics, provides a fascinating analysis of one the most important political questions in Scotland.
Available since: 08/01/2011.
Print length: 560 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Washington - The Making of the American Capital - cover

    Washington - The Making of the...

    Fergus M. Bordewich

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Washington, D.C., is home to the most influential power brokers in the world. But how did we come to call D.C.—a place once described as a mere swamp "producing nothing except myriads of toads and frogs (of enormous size)," and which was strategically indefensible, captive to the politics of slavery, and the target of unbridled land speculation—our nation's capital? In Washington, acclaimed, award-winning author Fergus M. Bordewich turns to the backroom deal-making and shifting alliances among our Founding Fathers to find out, and in doing so pulls back the curtain on the lives of the slaves who actually built the city. The answers revealed in this eye-opening book are not only surprising but also illuminate a story of unexpected triumph over a multitude of political and financial obstacles, including fraudulent real estate deals, overextended financiers, and management more apt for a banana republic than an emerging world power.In a page-turning work that reveals the hidden and unsavory side to the nation's beginnings, Bordewich once again brings his novelist's eye to a little-known chapter of American history.
    Show book
  • Think Tanks in America - cover

    Think Tanks in America

    Thomas Medvetz

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A revealing look at the rise of these influential institutions, and the effect they’ve had on the United States.   Think tanks have become fixtures of American politics, supplying advice to presidents and policy makers, expert testimony on Capitol Hill, and convenient facts and figures to journalists and media specialists. But what are think tanks? Who funds them? What kind of research do they produce? Where does their authority come from? And how influential have they become?   In Think Tanks in America, Thomas Medvetz argues that the unsettling ambiguity of the think tank is less an accidental feature of its existence than the very key to its impact. By combining elements of more established sources of public knowledge—universities, government agencies, businesses, and the media—think tanks exert a tremendous amount of influence on the way citizens and lawmakers perceive the world, unbound by the more clearly defined roles of those other institutions. In the process, they transform the government of this country, the press, and the political role of intellectuals. Timely, succinct, and instructive, this provocative book will force us to rethink our understanding of the drivers of political debate in the United States.
    Show book
  • The Evolution of the US Constitution - The Formation of the Constitution Debates of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 Constitutional Amendment Process & Actions by the US Congress Biographies of the Founding Fathers - cover

    The Evolution of the US...

    James Madison, U.S. Congress,...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    James Madison introduced 12 amendments to the First Congress in 1789. Ten of these would go on to become what we now consider to be the Bill of Rights. One was never passed, while another dealing with Congressional salaries was not ratified until 1992, when it became the 27th Amendment. Based on the Virginia Declaration of Rights, the English Bill of Rights, the writings of the Enlightenment, and the rights defined in the Magna Carta, the Bill of Rights contains rights that many today consider to be fundamental to America. 
    The Constitution of the United States of America is the supreme law of the United States. Empowered with the sovereign authority of the people by the framers and the consent of the legislatures of the states, it is the source of all government powers, and also provides important limitations on the government that protect the fundamental rights of United States citizens. The Constitution acted like a colossal merger, uniting a group of states with different interests, laws, and cultures. Under America's first national government, the Articles of Confederation, the states acted together only for specific purposes. The Constitution united its citizens as members of a whole, vesting the power of the union in the people. Without it, the American Experiment might have ended as quickly as it had begun. 
    Contents:  
    The Journal of the Debates in the Convention Which Framed the Constitution of the United States
    Constitutional Amendment Process 
    Measures Proposed to Amend the Constitution  
    Congress Creates the Bill of Rights
    Constitution
    Amendments 
    Biographies of the Founding Fathers
    Show book
  • The Roman Imperial Succession - cover

    The Roman Imperial Succession

    John D. Grainger

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    An investigation of how a man could become a Roman emperor, and the failure to create an enduring, consistent system for selecting the next emperor.  
     
    John D. Grainger analyses the Roman imperial succession, demonstrating that the empire organized by Augustus was fundamentally flawed in the method it used to find emperors. Augustus’s system was a mixture of heredity, senatorial, and military influences, and these were generally antagonistic. Consequently, the Empire went through a series of crises, in which the succession to a previous, usually dead, emperor was the main issue. The infamous “Year of the Four Emperors,” AD 69, is only the most famous of these crises, which often involved bouts of bloody and destructive civil war, assassinations and purges. These were followed by a period, usually relatively short, in which the victor in the “crisis” established a new system, juggling the three basic elements identified by Augustus, but which was as fragile and short lived as its predecessor; these “consequences” of each crisis are discussed. The lucid and erudite text is supported by over 22 genealogical tables and 100 images illustrating the Emperors. 
     
    Praise of The Roman Imperial Succession 
     
    “For a general introduction to the question of how one becomes a Roman emperor, Grainger has provided a sound guide.” —Bryn Mawr Classical Review
    Show book
  • Abuse of Power - The Three-Year Campaign to Impeach Donald Trump - cover

    Abuse of Power - The Three-Year...

    Fred V. Lucas, Craig Shirley

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Trump's enemies set out to remove him from office even before his inauguration—which culminated in an election-year impeachment trial.Abuse of Power exposes: how Elizabeth Warren tried to set an impeachment trap for Trump even before the inauguration; why the depths of the Biden family's international conflict of interests are worthy of a federal investigation; why Nancy Pelosi caved to The Squad to remain leadership; how Adam Schiff pushed Jerry Nadler out of the key spot to lead the impeachment; how Democrats abandoned what would have been a crowning left-wing achievement in gun control legislation in order to pursue an impeachment that was destined to fail in the Senate; and how Mitt Romney's vote to convict likely prevented three moderate Democrats from rebelling against party leaders.
    Show book
  • Listen We Need to Talk - How to Change Attitudes about LGBT Rights - cover

    Listen We Need to Talk - How to...

    Brian F. Harrison, Melissa R....

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    American public opinion tends to be sticky. Although the news cycle might temporarily affect the public's mood on contentious issues like abortion, the death penalty, or gun control, public opinion toward these issues has remained remarkably constant over decades. There are notable exceptions, however, particularly with regard to divisive issues that highlight identity politics. For example, over the past three decades, public support for same-sex marriage has risen from scarcely more than a tenth to a majority of the population. Why have people's minds changed so dramatically on this issue, and why so quickly? It wasn't just that older, more conservative people were dying and being replaced in the population by younger, more progressive people; people were changing their minds. Was this due to the influence of elite leaders like President Obama? Or advocacy campaigns by organizations pushing for greater recognition of the equal rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) people?Listen, We Need to Talk tests a new theory, what Brian Harrison and Melissa Michelson call The Theory of Dissonant Identity Priming, about how to change people's attitudes on controversial topics. Harrison and Michelson conducted randomized experiments all over the United States, many in partnership with equality organizations, including Equality Illinois, Georgia Equality, Lambda Legal, Equality Maryland, and Louisiana's Capital City Alliance. They found that people are often willing to change their attitudes about LGBT rights when they find out that others with whom they share an identity (for example, as sports fans or members of a religious group) are also supporters of those rights-particularly when told about support from a leader of the group, and particularly if they find the information somewhat surprising.Fans of the Green Bay Packers football team were influenced by hearing that a Packers Hall-of-Famer is a supporter of LGBT rights. African Americans were influenced by hearing that the Black president of the United States is a supporter. Religious individuals were influenced by hearing that a religious leader is a supporter. And strong partisans were influenced by hearing that a leader of their party is a supporter. Through a series of engaging experiments and compelling evidence, Listen, We Need to Talk provides a blueprint for thinking about how to bring disparate groups together over contentious political issues.
    Show book