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Historical Mysteries - cover

Historical Mysteries

Andrew Lang

Publisher: Serapis Classics

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Summary

'Everyone has heard of the case of Elizabeth Canning,' writes Mr. John Paget; and till recently I agreed with him. But five or six years ago the case of Elizabeth Canning repeated itself in a marvellous way, and then but few persons of my acquaintance had ever heard of that mysterious girl...

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