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Today South London Tomorrow South London - cover

Today South London Tomorrow South London

Andrew Grumbridge, Mr Vince Raison

Publisher: Unbound Digital

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Summary

South London-based blog, Deserter, is an alt guide to living and loafing in the wonky wonderland south of the river. Its authors, under their noms de plume Dulwich Raider and Dirty South, record off-beat days out and urban adventures featuring pubs, cemeteries, galleries, hospitals and pubs again, often in the company of their volatile dealer, Half-life, and the much nicer Roxy. 
Part guide, part travelogue, this book is a collection of these tales with the addition of lots of new material that their publisher absolutely insisted upon. South London, that maligned wasteland where cabbies once feared to drive, can no longer be ignored. The South is risen! 
 
"The ultimate reprobates’ handbook to God’s own side of the river - your liver may never be the same again... Wonderful." 
- Jenny Eclair 
“Of all the books about South London since 1947 this has to be the best.” 
- Jay Rayner 
“If a man is tired of London he should read this book.” 
- Bruce Dessau (London Evening Standard, Beyond The Joke) 
“Deserter’s panoply of wastrels throw up the odd genuine revelation... historical, cultural or psychogeographical treasure. They may not mean to educate, but they do.” 
- Ned Boulting, who also writes the foreword

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