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To Poison a Nation - The Murder of Robert Charles and the Rise of Jim Crow Policing in America - cover

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To Poison a Nation - The Murder of Robert Charles and the Rise of Jim Crow Policing in America

Andrew Baker

Publisher: The New Press

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Summary

Strong current affairs angle: Shows the historical roots of the police violence against African Americans in today’s headlines.



 
Successful genre: Like The New Jim Crow, Baker argues that America's history of Jim Crow is directly relevant to today's debates over race and policing.



 
Strongest New Press categories: Criminal Justice and Popular History are two of our strongest publishing fields.



 
Outreach to criminal justice field: This book is a natural reference for our large criminal justice network and we will market directly to them.



 
Exciting new talent: Baker is a young, Harvard-trained historian on the rise in the academy; To Poison a Nation reads like the best pop trade history and has already attracted blurbs from high-profile scholars.



 
Strong serial potential: To Poison a Nation is built around a single charismatic person and an explosive event – ideal for major first serial placement.

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