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Stop Carrying the Weight of Your MS - The Art of Losing Weight Healing Your Body and Soothing Your Multiple Sclerosis - cover

Stop Carrying the Weight of Your MS - The Art of Losing Weight Healing Your Body and Soothing Your Multiple Sclerosis

Andrea Wildenthal Hanson

Publisher: Morgan James Publishing

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Summary

Make your own rules for weight loss instead of breaking someone else’s! Losing weight doesn’t have to mean sacrificing happiness–especially when you want to do what’s best for your body and your MS. If you’re ready to make your health a top priority and find your individual answer to healing your body then Stop Carrying the Weight of Your MS is an essential piece of the puzzle. Losing weight is a known solution to slowing multiple sclerosis progression and making symptoms more manageable. But diets can be very complex and restrictive, leaving people to feel lacking and like they’re failing at staying healthy. The good news is losing weight doesn’t have to be like that. Diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2000, Hanson found the key to lasting lifestyle change is making personally meaningful decisions. Building on books like Terry Wahls’ The Wahls Protocol, and other MS diet books, Hanson moves beyond intense diets and regimens to help her readers create a new way of eating that is sustainable and customizable.

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