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AliceFirst day at school - cover

AliceFirst day at school

Amelia K

Publisher: Amelia K

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Summary

Alice is 3 years old girl, a delightful little girl who loves adventures and playing with her friends and her family.  She is in learning age, everything is quite new for her.Alice invite you the see her life, her family, her activiies and also her friends.It's a happy place, happy activity for a happy little girl and her friends. 

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