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to make monsters out of girls - cover

to make monsters out of girls

Amanda Lovelace, ladybookmad

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

Winner of the 2016 Goodreads Choice Award for Best Poetry, amanda lovelace presents her new illustrated duology, “things that h(a)unt.” In this first installment, to make monsters out of girls, lovelace explores the memory of being in an abusive relationship. She poses the eternal question: Can you heal once you’ve been marked by a monster, or will the sun always sting?

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