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The Runaway Who Became President: SR Nathan’s Journey of Hope - Prominent Singaporeans - cover

The Runaway Who Became President: SR Nathan’s Journey of Hope - Prominent Singaporeans

Amanda Kee

Publisher: Epigram Books

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Summary

From a trying childhood to surviving the Japanese Occupation and even falling in love, the life of Singapore's longest-serving president, the late S.R. Nathan, turned out to be more colourful than many might imagine. 
The Runaway Who Became President not only introduces us to a man who dedicated his life to the service of our nation, but also to the various people who helped him work through his own challenges and shape him as a well-loved and respected Singaporean icon.

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