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Wild Woods - An Explorer's Guide to Britain's Woods and Forests - cover

Wild Woods - An Explorer's Guide to Britain's Woods and Forests

Alvin Nicholas

Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides

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Summary

Explore over 450 of the most magical, extraordinary and lesser-known woods and forests in England, Scotland and Wales with this unique, practical and fully illustrated book. Featuring stunning photography and lively travel writing, it is divided into easy-to-navigate geographical sections - Southwest, South and East, Wales, Central and North, and Scotland - and covers everything from the best campsites, bothies and quirky accommodation through to wild swimming, walking trails, types of woodland and forest, cycling routes, waterfalls, canoeing, wildflowers and wildlife, dark skies and stargazing, foraging, lost ruins and sacred, mystical and haunted sites.
 
Wild Woods reveals life-affirming ways to connect with wild places through adventure and is the perfect book for both families and wilderness lovers seeking new experiences well off the beaten track. Also included is a series of 'Best for.' recommendations, from 'Best for Lost Ruins' to 'Best for Charismatic Wildlife', as well as Untamed Waters, Caves and Canyons, and Quirky Stays among others. High-quality photography illustrates a selection of sites and a number of featured adventures are included.
 
With Bradt's Wild Woods visit historic forests such as Epping, Sherwood and the New Forest. Discover ancient and notable trees, healing springs and hidden castles and lose yourself in Britain's largest, wildest and most ancient woods and forests. Detailed, user-friendly instructions help to create wild weekend escapes and you can also learn about 'lost beasts' - megafauna such as wolves - and the evolution of ancient woodland. The legacy of royal forests and private chases is also covered. Whatever your interest in Britain's woods and forests, Bradt's Wild Woods is the ideal guide and companion.

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