Do you want to read 1 year without limits?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Understanding Franz Kafka - cover

Understanding Franz Kafka

Allen Thiher

Publisher: University of South Carolina Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Franz Kafka is without question one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century despite the fact that much of his work remained unpublished when he died at a relatively young age in 1924. Kafka’s eccentric methods of composition and his diffident attitude toward publishing left most of his writing to be edited and published after his death by his literary executor, Max Brod. In Understanding Franz Kafka, Allen Thiher addresses the development of Kafka’s work by analyzing it in terms of its chronological unfolding, emphasizing the various phases in Kafka’s life that can be discerned in his constant quest to find a meaning for his writing. Thiher also shows that Kafka’s work, frequently self-referential, explores the ways literature can have meaning in a world in which writing is a dubious activity.

After outlining Kafka’s life using new biographical information, Thiher examines Kafka’s first attempts at writing, often involving nearly farcical experiments. The study then shows how Kafka’s work developed through twists and turns, beginning with the breakthrough stories “The Judgment” and “The Metamorphosis,” continuing with his first attempt at a novel with Amerika, and followed by Kafka’s shifting back and forth between short fiction and two other unpublished novels, The Trial and The Castle.

Thiher also calls on Kafka’s notebooks and diaries. These help demonstrate that Kafka never stopped experimenting in his attempt to find a literary form that might satisfy his desire to create some kind of transcendental literary text in an era in which the transcendent is at best an object of nostalgia or of comic derision. In short, Thiher contends, Kafka constantly sought the grounds for writing in a world in which all appears groundless.

Who read this book also read:

  • Pornotopia - cover

    Pornotopia

    M. Christian

    • 0
    • 5
    • 0
    Have Your Ever –
    
    • Wanted to know how to give ideal cunnilingus?
    
    • Pondered the sexy history of pirates?
    
    • Needed to know how to give the best blowjob in the world?
    
    • Wondered how to put some sexy spice into your Halloween?
    
    • Fancied a few tips on how to ideally, and sensually, play with nipples and breasts?
    
    • Been curious about the very-kinky sex lives of famous people?
    
    Then Pornotopia is the book for you! Abundantly irreverent, totally bizarre, and relentlessly fun, Pornotopia will explore the mechanics of everything from giving the perfect blow-job to becoming a master of cunnilingus, from how to give a wonderful caning session to learning how to treat (and sexually mistreat) breasts and nipples, as well as a wide – and witty – assortment of essays and articles about sexy fashion disasters, historical personages of unusual gender, and even the sexual history of pirates and Japanese Samurai!
    
    Internationally renowned erotica author and sex educator, M. Christian has navigated the sticky, sweaty, steamy and (best of all) fun world of sex to bring to readers both novices as well as the experienced to bring all kinds of playful, and essential, information to light. Even the most jaded of sexual player will find something in Pornotopia – and for the brand-new at sex play Pornotopia will be become an essential resource.
    Show book
  • Exposed In the Sun - cover

    Exposed In the Sun

    Deborah Ford

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Everyone wonders why Kate married the slight, wimpy Daniel, everyone bar Kate. She longed for a submissive, cute guy she could dominate.
    So it’s no surprise when Kate instructs Daniel to be dressed as his alter ego Becky whilst on holiday. What could go wrong?
    Firstly poor Becky has to keep fun loving lads at bay whilst Kate is being seduced by a hunk. Secondly Becky soon finds herself on the receiving end of laddish bullying and teasing. Thirdly, Kate run off with the key to their room leaving Becky trapped in her string tied bikini. Worse Kate also holds the key to Daniel’s chastity belt.
    Becky becomes the butt of the men’s humiliating entertainment whilst his poor air headed brain tries to find a way out of his plight.
    
    No doubt you are horrified at the thought of being forced into a girlish role by your dominant lustful wife, while a group of hunky guys torment you as you find yourself dancing for a crowd and being spanked by a bully. So please ensure the smelling salts are at hand.
    Show book
  • The Best American Magazine Writing 2017 - cover

    The Best American Magazine...

    The American Society of Magazine...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    With the work of journalists under fire around the world, this year’s anthology of National Magazine Awards finalists and winners is a timely reminder of the power of journalism. These pieces from writers driven to explore America’s fault lines include Shane Bauer’s harrowing “My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard” (Mother Jones), a visceral portrait of the abuses of the carceral system, and Sarah Stillman’s account of the havoc wreaked on young people’s lives when they are put on sex-offender registries (The New Yorker). In two different considerations of parenting, Nikole Hannah-Jones looks for a school for her daughter in a rapidly changing, racially divided Brooklyn (New York Times Magazine) and Michael Chabon takes his thirteen-year-old son to Fashion Week in Paris (GQ). Pamela Colloff explores how the 1966 University  of Texas Tower mass shooting changed the course of one survivor’s life (Texas Monthly), and Siddhartha Mukherjee depicts the art and agony of oncology (New York Times Magazine).Other selections take up the shocks of the election, including Matt Taibbi’s irreverent dispatches from the campaign trail (Rolling Stone) and George Saunders’s transfixing account of Trump’s rallies (The New Yorker). Jeffrey Goldberg talks through Obama’s foreign-policy legacy with the president (The Atlantic), Andrew Sullivan fears for the future of democracy (New York), and Gabriel Sherman relates how the women of Fox News brought to light Roger Ailes’s predations (New York). Joining them are Rebecca Solnit’s wide-ranging Harper’s commentary, Becca Rothfeld’s pondering women waiting from The Odyssey to Tinder (Hedgehog Review), and bold expeditions into nature: David Quammen ventures to Yellowstone to consider the future of wild places (National Geographic), and Mac McClelland sets off for Cuba in search of the ivory-billed woodpecker (Audubon).
    Show book
  • Don't Be Afraid of the Bullets - An Accidental War Correspondent in Yemen - cover

    Don't Be Afraid of the Bullets -...

    Laura Kasinof

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Laura Kasinof studied Arabic in college and moved to Yemen a few years later—after a friend at a late-night party in Washington, DC, recommended the country as a good place to work as a freelance journalist. When she first moved to the capital city of Sanaa in 2009, she was the only American reporter based in the country. She quickly fell in love with Yemen’s people and culture, and even found herself the star of a local TV soap opera.When antigovernment protests broke out in Yemen in 2011, part of the revolts sweeping the Arab world at the time, she contacted the New York Times to see if she could cover the rapidly unfolding events for the newspaper. Laura never planned to be a war correspondent, but found herself in the middle of brutal government attacks on peaceful protesters. As foreign reporters were rounded up and shipped out of the country, Laura managed to elude the authorities but found herself increasingly isolated—and even more determined to report on what she saw.With a new foreword by the author about what has happened in Yemen since the book’s initial publication, Don’t Be Afraid of the Bullets is a fascinating and important debut by a talented young journalist.
    Show book
  • Talking to a Shaman - cover

    Talking to a Shaman

    Anthony Bogrjantseff

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    This book focuses on spirituality, mind-body health, trans-personal psychology, and spiritually oriented self-help. It aims to engage, improve, inspire, educate, motivate and be emotionally healing to readers from any societal background, interested in exploring their inner world, and willing to understand how their thoughts can impact their life.A motivational and inspirational guide, it is written in the form of the author's dialogue with his Higher Self, or Inner Shaman. The book is presented as a mystical tale set in a deep Siberian taiga, taking the readers on an entertaining journey of self-discovery, advancement and wisdom. Talking to a Shaman helps the individual to look at the world from different angles, and gives us tools for improving our lives.
    Show book
  • The Complete Works of Jane Austen - cover

    The Complete Works of Jane Austen

    Jane Austen

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Complete Works of Jane Austen includes all six novels, and Austen’s shorter works; Lady Susan, The Watsons, Sandition, and her complete Juvenilia. Jane Austen is famous for her six novels, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion. Her works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature. Her realism, biting irony and social commentary as well as her acclaimed plots have gained her historical importance among scholars and critics.
    Show book