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A Woman Under the Surface - Poems and Prose Poems - cover

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A Woman Under the Surface - Poems and Prose Poems

Alicia Ostriker

Publisher: Princeton University Press

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Summary

From A Woman Under the Surface:MOON AND EARTH Alicia Ostriker ? Of one substance, of oneMatter, they have cruellyBroken apart. They never will touch Each other again. The shiningLovelier and youngerTurns away, a pitiful girl. She is completely nakedAnd it hurts. The largerMotherly one, breathlessly luminous Emerald, and blue, and whiteTraveling mists, suffersBirth and death, birth and death, and the shockOf internal heat killed by external cold.They are dancing through that blackness. They press as ifTo come closer.

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