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A Day at the County Fair - cover

A Day at the County Fair

Alice Hale Burnett

Publisher: Krill Press

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Summary

Alice   Hale Burnett was an American author of children's books. She is best known   for writing books set in a small town called Merryvale. Her books were   originally published by The New York Book Company early in the Twentieth   century.

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