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Idylls of the King (Unabridged) - Arthurian Romances - cover

Idylls of the King (Unabridged) - Arthurian Romances

Alfred Tennyson

Publisher: Musaicum Books

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Summary

Alfred Tennyson's 'Idylls of the King' is a poetic masterpiece that retells the legends of King Arthur and his knights in a series of interconnected narrative poems. Tennyson's lyrical style and use of vivid imagery transport readers to the mythical world of Camelot, bringing to life the themes of honor, love, and betrayal. The book's exploration of chivalry and the downfall of a once-great kingdom make it a timeless classic of British literature. Written in blank verse, the poem showcases Tennyson's skill in crafting elegant language and complex characters. 'Idylls of the King' is a must-read for those interested in Romantic poetry and the Arthurian legend. Alfred Tennyson, known as one of the most prominent Victorian poets, was appointed Poet Laureate of Great Britain in 1850. His fascination with Arthurian legends and medieval themes inspired him to write 'Idylls of the King,' which reflects his deep understanding of the ideals of knighthood and the complexities of human nature. Tennyson's own experiences and observations of Victorian society also influenced his portrayal of Arthurian characters in a contemporary light. I highly recommend 'Idylls of the King' to readers who appreciate rich, emotionally resonant poetry and timeless tales of valor and tragedy. Tennyson's epic work will captivate and enchant those who seek a deep dive into Arthurian lore and the enduring power of myth.
Available since: 03/21/2018.
Print length: 214 pages.

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