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A Letting of Blood - cover

A Letting of Blood

Alf Smith

Publisher: Alf Smith

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Summary

SYNOPSIS 
A Letting of Blood 
The story is a grim one; about death by murder and mutilation, in the most callous and wanton circumstances of cruelty.  This account has been written to placate my mind for; although it has been told and retold many times by countless sources, the writers have always gotten it wrong, and this misinformation has annoyed me to such a degree that I now set down this collection of words to correct the failure and misrepresentation of past publications that have contained nothing but a fabrication of truth and a distortion of facts.  
The revelation that I have chronicled involves a character of history who has evolved throughout time into somewhat of a legendary status.  His name is the epitome of the worst kind of bogeyman; which is a common allusion to a fictitious being that is used by adults to frighten children.  However, this is not a story about some category of mythical creature, but a retelling of a collection of evil murders perpetrated upon women in the times of Queen Victoria.  The murderer truly existed in this period and his actual name has never been revealed, due to the fact that he was never captured.  His deeds, however, will forever be preserved in history and, although he has now ceased to exist through the expenditure and passage of time; as must we all; he will always be remembered by the alias by which he was anointed; that nickname being – Jack the Ripper. 
I have been referring to the murderer in the singular manner of speech, as this mode represents the most common principal and underlying fault that has been accepted and used by previous correspondents, who have written about the case studies.  In accepting, quite erroneously, that the inhuman monster of the murders was a singular person, they were utterly mistaken; for it was not one singular individual who committed these atrocities, but instead, the murders were committed by a combination of three people.  
I have decided against writing down the bare facts in just fragmented piecemeal, as this would be exceedingly dry and extremely short for the reader.  Instead, I have consigned the story into a narrative presentation, so as to enhance the flavour of the events that transpired and, in doing so, hope that appreciation can be felt of the true horror that befell this collection of women who were consigned to death by the razor-sharp blades that were held in the hands of their heartless, merciless and cold-blooded killers. 
These murders occurred in a relatively short space of time and, once they had ceased, they were never recontinued.  I have outlined the reason surrounding the stoppage of these events and how this came to be.  I have also furnished details of what manner of future lay in wait for these killers, following their diabolical deeds. 
I apologise for the graphic detail that is outlined within these pages but hope that you can gauge some form of appreciation of how exceptionally evil these creatures of death truly were. 

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