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The Human Ear (NHB Modern Plays) - cover

The Human Ear (NHB Modern Plays)

Alexandra Wood

Publisher: Nick Hern Books

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Summary

A man turns up at Lucy's door claiming to be the brother she hasn't seen in ten years. But why has he come? Is it really him? And what happens when there's another knock at the door?
An intriguing tale of loss, renewal and knowing who to trust, Alexandra Wood's The Human Ear was first produced by Paines Plough in their pop-up theatre, Roundabout, at the 2015 Edinburgh Festival Fringe, before touring.
Available since: 08/01/2015.
Print length: 96 pages.

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