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Boris Godunov: A Drama in Verse - cover

Boris Godunov: A Drama in Verse

Alexander Pushkin

Translator Alfred Hayes

Publisher: Charles River Editors

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Summary

Alexander Pushkin was an influential Russian writer in the early 19th century.  Pushkin was considered to be the Russia’s greatest poet and he also helped create modern Russian literature.  This edition of Boris Godunov: A Drama in Verse includes a table of contents.

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