Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Secular Games - cover

Secular Games

Alex Wylie

Publisher: Eyewear Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Secular Games is Alex Wylie's debut collection. Formally exploratory and inventive, its poems range across subjects and settings: ninth-century Japan, Renaissance Italy, the surface of Venus, focusing afresh our own historical moment. Written over eleven years, this book is a poetic testament of our era in exacting, sensuous, restless language.

Other books that might interest you

  • Short Story Press Presents Ghost Stalker - A Woman Cannot Escape a Ghostly Follower - cover

    Short Story Press Presents Ghost...

    Short Story Press, Isabella Bailey

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "Prowler" is a marriage of supernatural horror and psychological thriller, a story about how our personal issues can manifest in strange and unnerving ways. 
    • Our protagonist, Victoria, is a successful businesswoman. 
    • She has a history of mental illness, but that's behind her now, despite what her distant husband might say. 
    • What starts out as a normal day at the office is turned upside down by the appearance of a mysterious figure that only Victoria can see. 
    • It soon becomes clear that this being, whatever it is, is following her. 
    • As Victoria tries to make the creature go away, her demons begin to creep up on her again. 
    Surrounded by people who don't believe her and struggling to keep herself together, can Victoria figure out who this being is before her sanity deteriorates? 
    About The Writer 
    Isabella Bailey is a senior at New York University, where she studies film and television. A lifelong storyteller, she began to write when she was in the first grade, and has been honing her craft ever since. She was first published in Excellence, a 2006 poetry compilation, and her writing has since appeared in places such as Baedeker Travel Magazine, 401kWire.com, MFWire.com, and Mindfray.com. Her television screenplays were finalists in both the 2017 and 2019 Fusion Film Festivals, and is writing a novel in her spare time. She hopes to continue to professionally pursue narrative storytelling, and is thrilled to share her work here. 
    Short Story Press publishes short stories written by everyday writers.
    Show book
  • The Poetry of Music - cover

    The Poetry of Music

    William Shakespeare, Lord Byron,...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    ‘If music be the food of love play on.’  The evocative words of William Shakespeare not only capture the addictive quality of love but also of music.  Poets have an ability with their words and phrases to provide a rhythm, an atmosphere.  When this is allied to their musings on music we are captivated.
    Show book
  • The Poet Laureates Volume 1 - cover

    The Poet Laureates Volume 1

    John Skelton, Ben Jonson, Edmund...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Poet Laureates. Volume 1.  The office of Poet Laureate is a high honour amongst poets. The Ancient Greeks had the first idea and their heroes and Poets wore wreaths of Laurel in honour of the god Apollo.  Many countries now have a Laureate as do many societies and organisations.  But perhaps ranked first among them all is that of our own Poet Laureate. Unfortunately no single authentic definitive record exists of the office of Poet Laureate of England.  In some form it can be traced back to 1189 and Richard Canonicus who was employed by Richard I with the title “versificator Regis”.  It is said that Geoffrey Chaucer was called Poet Laureate, being granted in 1389 an annual allowance of wine.   After that there were a succession of ‘volunteer Laureates’.  It is not until 1617 that King James I created the post as it is known today for Ben Jonson, although it appears not to have been a formal appointment. That formality:- The title of Poet Laureate, as a royal office, was first conferred by letters patent on John Dryden in 1670 And from there we have procession of outstanding poets among them William Wordsworth, Alfred Lord Tennyson and Alfred Austin.  Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe.
    Show book
  • Antony and Cleopatra - cover

    Antony and Cleopatra

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written sometime between 1603 and 1607. It was first printed in the First Folio of 1623. The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Life of Marcus Antonius and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's suicide. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumviri and the future first emperor of Rome. The tragedy is a Roman play characterized by swift, panoramic shifts in geographical locations and in registers, alternating between sensual, imaginative Alexandria and the more pragmatic, austere Rome.
    Show book
  • The Fountain - cover

    The Fountain

    James Russell Lowell

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    LibriVox volunteers bring you 12 recordings of The Fountain by James Russell Lowell. This was the weekly poetry project for December 14th, 2008.
    Show book
  • Vulgar Mechanics - cover

    Vulgar Mechanics

    K.B Thors

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Grappling with queerness and trauma from Alberta to Brooklyn, powering through body, sex, and gender to hit free open roads
    In Vulgar Mechanics, K. B. Thors seeks to invent new strategies for survival through the two most basic tools available to the speaker: language and the body. The work begins in collapse, the poems acting as witness to the death of a mother. The speaker documents how, as her mother's physical body disintegrates, hidden knowledge rises to the surface in the form of "seismic legacy data." As dark secrets are released, the desire for justice demands improvisation. Moving from the fracked landscapes of the prairies to the steep verticality of New York, this is a collection concerned with hunger, anger, and the shifting fault-lines between play and pain. The poems celebrate the body as a vehicle of excavation and self-determination in a world in which there may be no such a thing as a safe word. Thors pushes against the boundaries of language  -  the material of sense, meaning  -  in order to claim a quantum vision of the self, one who transforms trauma into energy through its own multiplicity. The body becomes both ghost and machine, burning the past in its engine to make something beautiful and new, "a thunder egg / bucking the fire pit."
    Show book