What's better than reading? Reading withour limits :D
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Uberland - How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Rules of Work - cover

Uberland - How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Rules of Work

Alex Rosenblat

Publisher: University of California Press

  • 0
  • 3
  • 0

Summary

Silicon Valley technology is transforming the way we work, and Uber is leading the charge. An American startup that promised to deliver entrepreneurship for the masses through its technology, Uber instead built a new template for employment using algorithms and Internet platforms. Upending our understanding of work in the digital age, Uberland paints a future where any of us might be managed by a faceless boss.   The neutral language of technology masks the powerful influence algorithms have across the New Economy. Uberland chronicles the stories of drivers in more than twenty-five cities in the United States and Canada over four years, shedding light on their working conditions and providing a window into how they feel behind the wheel. The book also explores Uber’s outsized influence around the world: the billion-dollar company is now influencing everything from debates about sexual harassment and transportation regulations to racial equality campaigns and labor rights initiatives.   Based on award-winning technology ethnographer Alex Rosenblat’s firsthand experience of riding over 5,000 miles with Uber drivers, daily visits to online forums, and face-to-face discussions with senior Uber employees, Uberland goes beyond the headlines to reveal the complicated politics of popular technologies that are manipulating both workers and consumers.

Other books that might interest you

  • Goodbye Sweet Girl - A Story of Domestic Violence and Survival - cover

    Goodbye Sweet Girl - A Story of...

    Kelly Sundberg

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    "In her stunning memoir, Kelly Sundberg examines the heart-breaking bonds of love, detailing her near decade-long marriage’s slide into horrific abuse. Sundberg shares her own confusions, fears and empathy for her violent husband, even as she comes to realize he will never change. This is an immensely courageous story that will break your heart, leave you in tears, and, finally, offer hope and redemption. Brava, Kelly Sundberg."—Rene Denfeld, author of The Child Finder 
    "A fierce, frightening, soulful reckoning—Goodbye, Sweet Girl is an expertly rendered memoir that investigates why we stay in relationships that hurt us, and how we survive when we leave them. Kelly Sundberg is a force. She has written the rare book that has the power to change lives."—Christa Parravani, author of Her: A Memoir 
    In this brave and beautiful memoir, written with the raw honesty and devastating openness of The Glass Castle and The Liar’s Club, a woman chronicles how her marriage devolved from a love story into a shocking tale of abuse—examining the tenderness and violence entwined in the relationship, why she endured years of physical and emotional pain, and how she eventually broke free. 
    "You made me hit you in the face," he said mournfully. "Now everyone is going to know." "I know," I said. "I’m sorry." 
    Kelly Sundberg’s husband, Caleb, was a funny, warm, supportive man and a wonderful father to their little boy Reed. He was also vengeful and violent. But Sundberg did not know that when she fell in love, and for years told herself he would get better. It took a decade for her to ultimately accept that the partnership she desired could not work with such a broken man. In her remarkable book, she offers an intimate record of the joys and terrors that accompanied her long, difficult awakening, and presents a haunting, heartbreaking glimpse into why women remain too long in dangerous relationships. 
    To understand herself and her violent marriage, Sundberg looks to her childhood in Salmon, a small, isolated mountain community known as the most redneck town in Idaho. Like her marriage, Salmon is a place of deep contradictions, where Mormon ranchers and hippie back-to-landers live side-by-side; a place of magical beauty riven by secret brutality; a place that takes pride in its individualism and rugged self-sufficiency, yet is beholden to church and communal standards at all costs. 
    Mesmerizing and poetic, Goodbye, Sweet Girl is a harrowing, cautionary, and ultimately redemptive tale that brilliantly illuminates one woman’s transformation as she gradually rejects the painful reality of her violent life at the hands of the man who is supposed to cherish her, begins to accept responsibility for herself, and learns to believe that she deserves better.
    Show book
  • Evidence of Love - A True Story of Passion and Death in the Suburbs - cover

    Evidence of Love - A True Story...

    John Bloom, Jim Atkinson

    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    Edgar Award Finalist: The “sensational” true story of two desperate housewives and the killing that shocked a Texas community (Los Angeles Times Book Review). Candy Montgomery and Betty Gore had a lot in common: They sang together in the Methodist church choir, their daughters were best friends, and their husbands had good jobs working for technology companies in the north Dallas suburbs known as Silicon Prairie. But beneath the placid surface of their seemingly perfect lives, both women simmered with unspoken frustrations and unanswered desires.   On a hot summer day in 1980, the secret passions and jealousies that linked Candy and Betty exploded into murderous rage. What happened next is usually the stuff of fiction. But the bizarre and terrible act of violence that occurred in Betty’s utility room that morning was all too real.   Based on exclusive interviews with the Montgomery Gore and families, Evidence of Love is the riveting account of a gruesome tragedy and the trial that made national headlines when the defendant entered the most unexpected of pleas: not guilty by reason of self-defense (Fort Worth Star-Telegram).   Adapted into the Emmy and Golden Globe Award–winning television movie A Killing in a Small Town, this chilling tale of sin and savagery will “fascinate true crime aficionados” (Kirkus Reviews).
    Show book
  • Charles Manson - The Man Who Murdered the Sixties - cover

    Charles Manson - The Man Who...

    David J. Krajicek

    • 1
    • 6
    • 0
    Charles Manson was an unlikely messiah. Freshly paroled, he stumbled into San Francisco in 1967 just as thousands of impressionable young people were streaming into town for the Summer of Love. 
     
    Posing as a musician-come-guru-come-Christ-figure, Manson built a commune cult of hippies, consisting mainly of troubled young women. But what made this group set out on the four-week killing spree that claimed seven lives? Former Journalism Professor, David J Krajicek, seeks to discover just that. 
     
    This book includes: • Introduction into the counterculture of the sixties • In-depth profiles of Manson's followers • Breakdowns of each murder, including diary accounts, interviews and legal testimonies from the killers themselves • An account of the events in Manson's own words • Insight into Manson's manipulations and psychology 
     
    Set against events of the time - the sexual revolution, the civil rights movement, race riots, space exploration, rock music -this is the story of Flower Power gone to seed.
    Show book
  • Incident at Big Sky - The Inside Story of the Search for Two Savage Killers in Montana - cover

    Incident at Big Sky - The Inside...

    Malcolm McConnell, Johnny France

    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    Edgar Award Finalist: The thrilling true story of the abduction of world-class biathlete Kari Swenson and the five-month manhunt to bring her tormentors to justice.   Former rodeo cowboy Johnny France had been sheriff of Madison County, Montana, for three years when Kari Swenson, a Bozeman resident training for the World Biathlon Championship, went missing near Big Sky Resort in July 1984. Her friends feared that Kari had been attacked by a grizzly bear, but the truth was far scarier: She’d been kidnapped at gunpoint by father-and-son survivalists Don and Dan Nichols. The pair had been living in the wilderness off and on for years and hoped to make Kari a “mountain woman” and Dan’s bride. But the plan went horribly wrong from the start, and after a deadly firefight with rescuers, the kidnappers vanished into the rugged terrain of the Spanish Peaks.   As Montana’s summer froze into brutal winter blizzards, SWAT teams, forest rangers, and antiterrorist units searched the backcountry but sighted the mountain men only once. Then came the call about a strange campfire on a slope above the Madison River. Sheriff France decided to go into the forest to face the fugitives—alone. The resulting showdown made him “perhaps the most famous Western sheriff since Wyatt Earp . . . a modern legend” (Chicago Tribune).  Incident at Big Sky is the “exciting,” edge-of-your-seat account of a shocking crime that made headlines around the world (The New York Times Book Review). In a voice as distinctive and compelling as the Montana landscape, France takes readers on a high-stakes adventure so bizarre and unforgettable it could only be true.  
    Show book
  • A Card From Angela Carter - cover

    A Card From Angela Carter

    Susannah Clapp

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    Angela Carter was one of the most vivid voices of the twentieth century. When she died in 1992 at the age of fifty-one, she had published fifteen books of fiction and essays; outrage at her omission from any Booker Prize shortlists led to the foundation of the Orange Prize. 
     
    Angela Carter sent her friend Susannah Clapp postcards from all over the world, missives which form a paper trail through her life. The pictures she chose were sometimes domestic, sometimes flights of fantasy and surrealism. The messages were always pungent. 
     
    Here, Susannah Clapp uses postcards – the emails of the twentieth century – to travel through Angela Carter's life, and to evoke her anarchic intelligence, fierce politics, rich language and ribaldry, and the great swoops of her imagination.
    Show book
  • From Normandy to Auschwitz - cover

    From Normandy to Auschwitz

    Paul le Goupil

    • 2
    • 4
    • 0
    The odds on Paul le Goupil living to see the end of the Second World War let alone the 21st Century were negligible in 1944. Yet he did.As his extraordinary memoir describes, as a young man he found himself caught up in the maelstrom of the Second World War, active resistance to, and defiance of, the German occupation came naturally to Paul but led to his capture, beating and interrogation by the Gestapo and solitary incarceration in first French prisons. Worse still was to come and after an appalling journey and various labor camps he ended up in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. He experienced starvation, slave labor, unbelievable hardship—death for many was a relief.Paul survived but his suffering was not over as he and others had to endure a nightmare march before being liberated by the advancing Russians. All this and far more make this memoir an unforgettable, moving and inspiring account.
    Show book