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A Basque Diary - Living in Hondarribia - cover

A Basque Diary - Living in Hondarribia

Alex Hallatt

Publisher: Moontoon Publishing

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Summary

When cartoonist Alex Hallatt wanted to learn Spanish, she moved to the Basque Country. She thought she might stay a few months and ended up there for over two years, living in a small town near San Sebastian.

 
This is the illustrated account of her years in Hondarribia. It is a useful resource for anyone planning on spending time in the Basque Country, detailing what to expect in each month and how to make the most of the geographical, culinary and cultural attractions on offer.

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