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999 - New Stories Of Horror And Suspense - cover

999 - New Stories Of Horror And Suspense

Al Sarrantonio

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

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Summary

A ward-winning writer and editor Al Sarrantonio gathers together twenty-nine original stories from masters of the macabre. From dark fantasy and pure suspense to classic horror tales of vampires and zombies, 999 showcases the extraordinary scope of fantastical fright fiction. The stories in this anthology are a relentless tour de force of fear, which will haunt you, terrify you, and keep the adrenaline rushing all through the night.

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