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Doing Germany: Book 2 - Doing Germany #2 - cover

Doing Germany: Book 2 - Doing Germany #2

Agnieszka Paletta

Publisher: Agnieszka Paletta

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Summary

DOING GERMANY is a series of books for those who are looking for an easy read and to laugh. This is the second book, but it can be read without reading the first book. 
 
In the sequel to the best-selling DOING GERMANY, Agnieszka Paletta picks up exactly where she left off. She is still a slave to chocolate and wine, still a Polish-Canadian-lover-of-Italy, still a grasshopper in a new country, Germany. Two years may have passed, but the moose-in-headlights persists as she continues to discover Deutschland. (After two years, what is there left to discover?) Ye, of little faith. Plenty and plenty and then some! And what's more, with many unexpected lessons that come with having a baby and owning a house. 
 
Ever an immigrant in a foreign land, Paletta will take you for a cultural spin as you explore Germany through her Polish-Canadian-Italian eyes. So just sit back and enjoy the humorous, witty ride. (And pour yourself a glass of wine while you're at it.)

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