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Assassinations Anthology - Plots and Murders That Would Have Changed the Course of WW2 - cover

Assassinations Anthology - Plots and Murders That Would Have Changed the Course of WW2

Adrian Gilbert, Nigel West, Dan Mills

Publisher: Frontline Books

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Summary

A fascinating look at what might have happened had historical assassination attempts succeeded.   If Hitler had died at any stage in the Second World War, would Germany have immediately sued for peace, or would the generals have taken over and fought a far more practical war than the obdurate Führer? Equally intriguing is the possible failed assassination attempt on General de Gaulle on British soil. Who, one wonders, was behind that scheme, and how would Anglo-French relations have developed if he had been killed?   In Assassinations Anthology, a number of well-known authors and historians look at past events where key individuals were involved in either attempts on their lives, or strange incidents occurred which, had they led to their deaths, might have radically affected the outcome of the war. Events surrounding Hitler and Operation Valkyrie, Stalin and Jan Smuts are investigated, as well as the peculiar circumstances relating to the theft of a valuable Gainsborough painting. Just how great a role did the Government’s Chief Whip, David Margesson, play in persuading the MPs to accept the unpopular Winston Churchill as Prime Minister, and what would have happened if Margesson had been killed when the Gainsborough disappeared? It is fascinating stuff. Grounded in actual events, the various scenarios portrayed in this collection examine the likely chain of events that would have followed if the assassination attempts had succeeded. A few inches, a few minutes—that was all the difference between life and death, and between the past that we know and one that we can only imagine.  

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