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How a Poem Moves - A Field Guide for Readers of Poetry - cover

How a Poem Moves - A Field Guide for Readers of Poetry

Adam Sol

Publisher: ECW Press

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Summary

A collection of playfully elucidating essays to help reluctant poetry readers become well-versed in verse
 
Developed from Adam Sol’s popular blog, How a Poem Moves is a collection of 35 short essays that walks readers through an array of contemporary poems. Sol is a dynamic teacher, and in these essays, he has captured the humor and engaging intelligence for which he is known in the classroom. With a breezy style, Sol delivers essays that are perfect for a quick read or to be grouped together as a curriculum. 
 
Though How a Poem Moves is not a textbook, it demonstrates poetry’s range and pleasures through encounters with individual poems that span traditions, techniques, and ambitions. This illuminating book is for readers who are afraid they “don’t get” poetry but who believe that, with a welcoming guide, they might conquer their fear and cultivate a new appreciation.

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