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The Murphy's law book for runners - cover

The Murphy's law book for runners

Adam Galambos

Translator Orsolya Szabó-Salfay

Publisher: Columb Kiadó

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Summary

You must be aware of the well known Murphy’s law: “if anything can go wrong, it will”. We all experience in some way or another during our lifetime how much this is true. We all feel several times that we are the victims of a conspiracy "from high above”, and just nothing turns out the way we planned. For example, the more we hurry somewhere, the more likely we will be delayed by every possible external factor. The bus that normally comes earlier, now arrives late. Where there never used to be a traffic jam, now we face one, and we could easily continue the list...
 
But how about runners? What Murphy's laws do they have to face?
 
When they want to persuade themselves to run, initial difficulties for beginners, re-beginners, and for those who want to lose weight
 
When they have to obtain new outfit and accessories. Shoes, outfit, shopping, sales
 
When they have to cope with certain internal elements. Diet and mentality
 
When they have to cope with external factors. The fight with various fields, other people, and dogs
 
When they have problems with the trainer or their training partners. Could be when they are in a training camp.
 
When they go for various competitions
 
Murphy’s difficulties of track-, cross country and mass competitions
 
Or when they run into each other, or in other words when they have a love life making friends on running tracks, relationships

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