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A Hint for Next Christmas - cover

A Hint for Next Christmas

A. A. Milne

Publisher: CDED

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Summary

Alan Alexander Milne was a British author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of Pooh overshadowed all his previous work. Milne served in both World Wars, joining the British Army in World War I, and was a captain of the British Home Guard in World War II.

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